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Sunday Reading: Prostitution the Swedish...

Last week I’ve read an article by Evie Embrechts, comparing the Swedish and the Dutch take on prostitution. Both countries adopted a defined public policy between 1998 and 2000 and now it is possible to see the impacts of both approaches. Basically in Sweden selling sex is egal – to make sure prostitutes cannot be arrested or blackmailed – and buying sex is illegal: the customer needs to stop abusing his power and make better choices. The Netherlands approach is quite different, in 2000 the laws against brothels and pimping were struck. These forms of prostitution –...
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Sunday Reading: Shell’s View of th...

Two weeks ago there was a really interesting article published on The New York Times about Shell’s view of the future. The author of the piece (McKENZIE FUNK) has also a publication on the accident of the platform perforating in the Arctic some years ago. This time, even if the trigger is the new permission of the dutch oil company to start exploring in the north, the author focuses on how Shell sees the future of oil consumption in the coming years. Shell is a huge company involved in several social and ecological scandals, but with the ability to foresee and shape...
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Sunday Reading: The Story Behind The Sil...

The Silk Road was the most popular black market platform on Internet. It was born as a libertarian experiment, where people could buy and sell anything, without constrains from any state (but with some general rules, forbidding for example child pornography). People started to send drugs over normal postal mail (even internationally), murders where ordered and the police went crazy trying to take them down. The story I bring today was published on Wired a time ago; it is the story of how the FBI captured the creator of the Silk Road (a crystallographer disenchanted with...
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Reading Sunday: A Blind Eye

Reading Sunday: A Blind Eye

For this weekend reading I bring a chronicle of an eye-surgeon working in West Africa. It reviews some of the main challenges physicians face when working in developing countries but also on the moral contradictions that pose the way developed countries are helping. As in the paragraphs I’m citing here under, training doctors take a long time (much more than desired); the alternative is to train non-doctors to perform basic surgeries and general medicine. But what are the consequences of this? Much debate is taking place with the Ebola epidemics, but the truth is...